What is a Triple Threat Model?

triple cards

After working in the Los Angeles market for some time, one day my daughter/client came to the realization that she was not interested in acting or dancing any longer. Even though she studied both for many years, she knew that she wanted to focus on one thing and one thing only – Modeling. Part of me was a bit disappointed, but the other part of me was relieved. There is great comfort in knowing what you want and more importantly, what you don’t want. We made a decision at that point to focus all of our attentions on her true passion – Modeling.

 

The showbiz term “triple threat” is one that is very popular. It is a common term used in the entertainment industry to describe a performer who has equally outstanding talent in three areas, most commonly actor/singer/dancer. It is particularly attractive because versatility in show business makes a performer more marketable, therefore making them very appealing to agents, managers, producers and directors. You will frequently see “actor/singer/dancer” or and any combination thereof on a performers resume or headshot. Beyoncé, Justin Timberlake and Jennifer Lopez are a few showbiz leaders who proudly garner this title.

 

Model is also loosely used as part of the triple threat title. It is a generally believed that “model” is a noun that can always be thrown in as an additional resume title. Frequently, it is tacked on to the end of a performers titles, almost as an afterthought. Momager’s who know the value of a triple threat title may use “model” even if their client is not actively pursuing modeling as a career. Anyone who has taken headshots, been asked to be photographed, or modeled in a shopping mall fashion show qualifies to put model as part of their credentials. But does this really qualify you as a model? Triple threat means to excel in three different arenas. If your client does not excel as a model, you may want to rethink using this as part of their credentials.

 

Unless you truly want to pursue other interests, models should focus their skillset on industry specifics. If your client is passionate about pursuing a career as a model, their resume should reflect such. Instead of listing three areas to showcase an ability to multitask, list the modeling areas of strength. A model’s resume should state the specific types of modeling they are best at. This could be commercial, editorial, runway, print, etc. with the areas of the greatest strength listed first. Younger models do not have as many modeling categories but they can certainly use fashion, print and runway on their modeling resume.

 

Your client does not have to focus on other areas if modeling is what they are most passionate about. Expose your client to various areas of the business and focus their attention on their areas of strength. The modeling industry is so vast, there is no reason your client cannot be a Triple Threat Model.

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